A Homemade Museum of Military Figures and Sketches (Musée de L’armée dans Maison)

Some time before, I have mentioned about my vast collection of military figures from different historical periods. Now I have made a type of “museum” displaying these figures accompanied by my sketches of historical period soldiers, weapons, and siege items. This sort of museum in my house is called the “Musée de L’armée dans maison” in French, which means the homemade army museum based on the original Musée de L’armée in the Hôtel des Invalides in Paris, which shows a massive collection of the history of the French army from the 13th– 20th centuries. The one I put up on the other hand shows a small but extensive collection of military scale model figures from almost every country in Europe dating from antiquity (4th century BC) to the 17th century having all sorts of soldiers, knights, legionnaires, warriors, and even samurais. The first and ultimate collectors items military figures are above the upper shelf arranged left to right in chronological order, behind them are my sketches of siege weapons (the chart of Roman siege items behind the Roman figures and the Byzantine siege weapons behind the Byzantine figures) while a postcard of Renaissance swords, guns, and helmets are behind the Renaissance figures. The scale model figures go from Greek, to Roman, to Barbarian, to Byzantine, to Medieval, to Renaissance, to Ottoman, here’s the list of the figures:

  • Macedonian Cavalryman 4th cent BC.
  • Roman Legionnaire 2nd cent
  • Roman Auxiliary 1st cent BC.
  • Roman Praetorian Guardsman 1st cent
  • Roman Centurion 1st cent
  • Frankish Soldier 6th cent
  • Byzantine Cataphract 11th cent
  • Varangian Guardsman (Byzantine) 12th cent
  • Spanish Knight 15th cent
  • English Knight 15th cent
  • Italian Knight 16th cent
  • German Knight 16th cent
  • French Musketeer 17th cent
  • Ottoman Sipahi Guardsman 15th cent
  • Ottoman Janissary 16th cent
  • Macedonian Cavalryman, Roman Legionnaire, Praetorian Guardsman, Roman Auxiliary, Roman Centurion figures
    Macedonian Cavalryman, Roman Legionnaire, Roman Auxiliary, Praetorian Guardsman, Roman Centurion
    Frankish soldier, Byzantine Cataphract, Varagian Guardsman, Spanish Knight, English Knight
    Frankish soldier, Byzantine Cataphract, Varagian Guardsman
    Spanish Knight, English Knight, Italian Knight, German Knight
    Spanish Knight, English Knight, Italian Knight, German Knight
    French Musketeer, Ottoman Guardsman, Ottoman Janissary
    French Musketeer, Ottoman Guardsman, Ottoman Janissary

    Full view of the Figures on the shelf
    Full view of the Figures on the shelf

Displayed on the walls are sheets with some of my sketches of historical soldier sets, which happen to be the best of them. First of all is the sheet with the 2 Greek Hoplites, the one on the left with white armor, a helmet, red cape, and a spear with a shield, the one on the right has a blue cape, bronze plated armor, a large round shield and a Greek sword. Below it is the sketch of 3 Roman military figures of the Roman army, a centurion, a standard bearer, and a praetorian guardsman. The next one below it shows 2 Byzantine military figures, the Varangian guards, soldiers from Nordic countries and Russia who served in protecting the Byzantine empire, both these Varangian guards carry a sword and axe or mace, have scaled armor, and a green cape. Right below it are 2 charts of weapons, one showing ancient Greek weapons, the other showing Roman weapons. The set with Greek weapons shows some of them including swords, javelins, bows, and daggers but lacking in spears and large round shields; the Roman weapon set on the other hand shows some swords, daggers, shields, bows, a banner, helmet, but lacking spears. The other wall shows historical maps (my sketches too) one of them is Europe in the 500’s (6th century), the other is Europe in the 1200’s (13th century), and the other is Europe in the 1700’s (18th century). In each map, it shows how the geography of Europe has changed over the centuries; such as in the 6th century, Europe was still made up of large kingdoms ruled by different tribes, as in the 13th century Europe is made of some small but some large kingdoms, but in the 18th century Europe’s kingdom’s were larger and some started forming empires but some remained as small independent states. Anyway, there is still a lot more to go in the collection.

Greek Hoplites and Roman military figures sketches
Greek Hoplites and Roman military figures sketches
IMG_2784
Byzantine Varangian Guards sketch
IMG_2785
Greek weapons chart (above) Roman weapons chart (below)
Europe Map 13th century with medieval charts and sketches
Europe Map 13th century with medieval charts and sketches
Europe Map 6th century (above) Europe Map 18th century (below)
Europe Map 6th century (above) Europe Map 18th century (below)

The next shelf shows the medieval army collection, of course above it are a few charts and sketches, and one of them is a postcard showing a full-scale crusader knight’s armor, showing its parts and weapons, although it is in French. The sketches show 6 different medieval soldier units; a Hospitaler knight, a Jerusalem knight, a Saracen soldier, an English longbow archer, a French knight, and a Spanish knight. On the table are the 4 medieval soldier figures:

  • Flemish Cavalry Knight 13th cent
  • English Archer 14th cent
  • French knight 14th cent
  • Italian Cavalry Knight 15th cent
  • Medieval military figures (Flemish Knight, English Archer, French Knight, Italian Knight)
    Medieval military figures (Flemish Knight, English Archer, French Knight, Italian Knight)

The next table has more of the figures but before the figure; let’s first go with the sketches and charts above. First of all is my sketch of the Byzantine military basics with the Byzantium war flag, basic weapons, a shield, Byzantine symbols, and a figure of a Byzantine army captain. Below is the chart of Byzantine weapons such as swords, shields, daggers, spears, a banner, a crossbow, and an early rifle. There is also a postcard showing the different types of French imperial guards of the 19th century, though this may look out of place, so does the Japanese print beside it. On the table, there are 7 figures, one side shows some other medieval European figures, while the other side shows a distinct Japanese Samurai collection, here’s the list:

  • Saracen Soldier 12th cent
  • Hospitaler Knight 13th cent
  • Polish Cavalry Knight 15th cent
  • Samurai standard bearer 16th cent
  • Samurai Spearman 16th cent
  • Samurai Katana warriors 16th cent
  • Samurai Katana warriors, Samurai spearman, Samurai standard bearer, Polish cavalry knight, Saracen soldier, and Hospitaler knight (sadly broken down) and Japanese traditional print and French Imperial Guard postcard behind
    Samurai Katana warriors, Samurai spearman, Samurai standard bearer, Polish cavalry knight, Saracen soldier, and Hospitaler knight (sadly broken down) and Japanese traditional print and French Imperial Guard postcard behind
  • Sketch of Byzantine military basics and army captain (above) sketch of Byzantine weapons (below)
    Sketch of Byzantine military basics and army captain (above) sketch of Byzantine weapons (below)

    IMG_2805

This is all now for my homemade military figures collection museum, if you were all wondering what it has, this is what. To give it more of a museum look rather than house decorations, I put different charts and panels with the warfare theme behind the figures to make it looks like it has a theme relating to the history period of each soldier, also there are flags beside the labels of the soldiers to point out which country it is from. The homemade museum of course is not overall the figures coming from different countries itself but on the charts and historical drawings it has, all of it put together to make history alive and visible in the same room, that’s all for now, thanks for viewing!

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